Mottled Duck


The Mottled Duck (Anas fulvigula) is a medium-sized dabbling duck found in the Gulf Coast of the United States. It ranges from 19 to 22 inches in length and has a wingspan of 32 to 36 inches. The Mottled Duck weighs between 1.5 to 2.5 pounds, making it slightly smaller than the Mallard. Males and females are similar in appearance, but males are slightly larger and have a more prominent green head.

The Mottled Duck has several distinguishing field marks that help identify it from other species. Its plumage is primarily brown with black speckles on the breast and white under the wings. The bill is yellow with a black tip, and the legs and feet are orange. The male’s head has a green iridescent patch that is visible in certain lighting conditions. In flight, the Mottled Duck shows a blue patch on its wings and a white underwing coverts.

The Mottled Duck is a non-migratory species that is restricted to the coastal regions of Texas, Louisiana, and Florida. This species prefers shallow freshwater marshes, coastal wetlands, and estuaries. They can also be found in agricultural fields and flooded pastures. The Mottled Duck is known to hybridize with the closely related Mallard, which can pose a threat to the genetic integrity of the Mottled Duck population.

The Mottled Duck is an omnivore that feeds on aquatic plants, seeds, and invertebrates such as snails, worms, and insects. They are primarily active during the day and can be observed dabbling or diving for food. The Mottled Duck is considered a conservation concern due to habitat loss, hunting pressure, and hybridization with the Mallard. Several conservation efforts have been put in place to protect the Mottled Duck population, including the restoration of wetland habitats and management of hunting regulations.

In summary, the Mottled Duck is a medium-sized dabbling duck found in the Gulf Coast of the United States. It ranges from 19 to 22 inches in length and has a wingspan of 32 to 36 inches. The Mottled Duck is primarily brown with black speckles on the breast, a yellow bill with a black tip, and orange legs and feet. This species is non-migratory and prefers shallow freshwater marshes, coastal wetlands, and estuaries. The Mottled Duck is an omnivore that feeds on aquatic plants, seeds, and invertebrates such as snails, worms, and insects. Conservation efforts are ongoing to protect this species from habitat loss, hunting pressure, and hybridization with the Mallard.