Monthly Archives: May 2023

Memorial Day Birding

As spring migration wraps up . . . Ingrid and I did a bit of birding over the long weekend. On Saturday we drove to the Brownfield in western Maine where we found a Louisiana Waterthrush singing loudly. On Sunday we drove up the coast a bit and found a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher singing in a […]

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Black-necked Stilt

Early in the summer of 2022 a Black-necked Stilt appeared in a salt panne adjacent to busy Route One in Scarborough. Birders from all over the state risked their lives walking the quarter mile required along this crazy stretch of road for a chance to see a bird rarely found so far from its southern […]

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Blackburnian Warbler

Reid State Park is one of Maine’s jewels . . . 770 acres of sand beaches, rocky shoreline, salt marshes and mixed forest.  During the summer, tourists flock to Reid for sun bathing, cookouts and to soak in the glory of the Maine coast.  It also has a great natural kiddie pool (a lagoon) that […]

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Two Weeks Left In Spring Migration

Spring migration in Maine continues and Ingrid and I are exhausted.  Both of us are up before dawn (and that comes pretty early at this latitude) and out to local birding hot spots as soon as we can get dressed and out the door.  Most evenings we’re out birding again. Ingrid has it a-lot tougher […]

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Hunting the Northern Waterthrush

Yesterday, I went hunting for a Northern Waterthrush . . . and found it . . . in the wrong place. Let me explain. Most of our Wood Warbler are bug eaters . . . moving through the trees and bushes looking for caterpillars, spiders and other delectable morsels.  The Northern Waterthrush and its cousin, […]

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Spring Migration . . . at last!!!

Finally  . . . at last . . . I thought it would never get here . . . but Spring migration has finally reached Maine. In the last week, I’ve seen 40 FOY birds (first of the year) and new sightings will continue through June 1st.  After a long winter of counting ducks . […]

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Spring storms blows Phalaropes ashore

There are believed to be a combined 8 million Red and Red-necked Phalaropes on planet earth . . . but unless you live in the Arctic regions or spend time out at sea . . . you’ll probably never see either one. That’s because these birds spend winters in tropical oceans far from land.  In […]

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Evening Grosbeaks

Those of you that read this blog regularly know that Ingrid and I spend (waste???) a considerable amount of time chasing birds around the State of Maine.  If we hear about an unusual bird within driving distance . . . we’re immediately in the car hoping to get a glimpse.  Often the bird has moved […]

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